Expressive Language Disorder

Some Facts About Expressive Language Disorder

 

Expressive Language Disorder

Expressive Language Disorder

Some things happen in life that we have no control over. Sometimes, bad things happen (and indeed, there is likely to have been a reason for it), and we are left to live with the consequences. This may be something severe such as dealing with the loss of life, or something simple and minor, like the loss of a notebook or a pen. Either way, we have to live with it and the looming shadow of an expressive language disorder is right down at the middle. This condition is actually incredibly common—you will be able to see it when you speak to a young child for example. They will understand everything you say, but they will have trouble expressing their own thoughts with speech or words. But at that point it is not considered a condition. Only when you replace the child with a fully grown adult does this actually start to pose a problem.

 

This is because adults should not have any trouble expressing their own thoughts, especially if they were educated and raised right. But as was stated above, certain things happen that we have no control over and this includes the onset of this disorder. Expressive language disorder is a possible condition for adults who have had a traumatic injury to the head—which then affects the brain. And since the brain is the organ controlling all thoughts and action, this includes expressiveness. A person with expressive language disorder will find it difficult to truly convey what he or she feels which is very similar to the frustration of a child who is unable to achieve the same thing.

 

The surprising part about this is that people with expressive language disorder are actually intelligent—or more commonly possesses normal intelligence, which is proof that the brain has suffered some form of damage. These people can understand everything you say, but cannot do the same with equal efficiency.